Women's Auxiliary Army Corps

By:Emily Mattis


Diary of Jane Date: May 15, 1942
Dear Diary,
I just got a letter from my boyfriend who is in the army. He works as a secretary, for now, he hasn’t been able to serve his country yet. I miss him so much, and I wish I could somehow help him serve our country. Maybe if I could help the war would be so much faster. I just found out that I can help! Army Chief of staff General George Marshall wants to make a Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps, or the WAAC. I personally think this is a great job. My boyfriend stinks at typing, so it’s kind of funny that he got the job of a secretary, I would be so much better at his job. There are a lot of jobs in the army that are held by men, but could be done so much better by women, that’s why the WAAC was made (Danzer 563). The WAAC will give military duties to women, these jobs will be non combat jobs, and allow the army to have more people fighting.
I’m going to sign up for the WAAC right now!
Bye,
Jane


external image MSS044.7.A003.jpgexternal image waac.poster.jpg
More than 13,000 women applied to be part of the WAAC on the first day!

Some of the jobs proformed by the women in the WAAC were (Hickman 1):

aircraft spotters
mechanics
parachute riggers
motor pool drivers
cryptologists
clerks
and
medical technicians


http://www.ncmuseumofhistory.org/workshops/WWII/Boyce.htm

http://library.uncg.edu/dp/wv/results167.aspx?i=861&s=7







Works Cited

Danzer A., Gerald, et al. The Americans:Reconstruction of the 21st Century. Boston: McDougal Littell, a Hughton Mifflin Company, 2003.

Hickman, Kennedy. "Women's Auxiliary Army Corps Formed." Kennedy's Military History Blog. 19 March, 2009. 15 May, 2007 <http://militaryhistory.about.com/b/2007/05/15/womens-auxiliary-army-corps-formed.htm>.